Acne-free skin for the start of the school year

Acne in teens: a rite of passage?

Acne is a very common problem that can mark certain people’s adolescence. It affects roughly 90% of the adolescent population. While some will occasionally notice a pimple here or there, others will see their faces covered with the typical skin lesions of acne—comedones (blackheads), pimples, papulae, pustules, or cysts.

Over time, acne lesions can cause skin damage that will remain during adulthood, including unsightly scars and marred skin.

A problem that shouldn’t be underestimated

Acne is a health problem that causes a lot of stress and suffering for many. Yet, the extent of the problem can be underestimated by loved ones or, at times, even by sufferers themselves.

Having acne can lead to repercussions, including the following:

  • timidity or excessive worrying
  • low self-esteem
  • withdrawal
  • relational difficulties
  • anxiety or depression

Here are some measures to opt for on a daily basis to care for acne-prone skin or to prevent acne.

Clean your skin

Clean your skin twice a day (morning and night), using warm water and a gentle cleansing product that is fragrance-free and adapted to your skin-type. Avoid using regular soap, which promotes acne. Regular cleaning helps to eliminate the surplus of sebum on the surface of your skin. Ask your pharmacist or cosmetician to recommend a cleanser.

Avoid rubbing your skin

Avoid rubbing your skin when cleaning it. Lather the product on the entire face, rinse adequately, and gently pat the skin dry with a towel.

Moisturize your skin.

Moisturize your skin. Use a quality, non-comedogenic product for oily skin. Dehydrated skin increases the production of sebum, which worsens acne.

Use light make-up

Use light make-up. Use non-comedogenic products without oil. Ask your cosmetician for advice when choosing make-up.

Use alcohol-free after-shave products to avoid drying out your skin.

Acne treatments

When a person suffers from acne, it is preferable not to wait until it goes away on its own. Tackling the problem head on can be beneficial in the short-term and especially in preventing any complications. Too many people let their acne problem slide and later regret not taking care of it sooner.

There are a wide range of therapeutic game-plans. Beauty products and medicated products, delivered with or without a prescription, are available. In the case of mild acne, over-the-counter products can be used, such as the ones containing benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid. Regular use during several weeks may be necessary before results can be observed, so you must be patient. Ask your pharmacist to recommend the product that is most suitable to your skin and your needs.

In some cases, acne treatment require a visit to a family doctor or dermatologist—healthcare professionals who are able to prescribe a treatment.

Take the appropriate action to ensure that acne is not your main concern at the start of the school year. Speak to your pharmacist for additional information about acne and its treatments.

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Acne-free skin for the start of the school year

Acne is a very common problem that can mark certain people’s adolescence. It affects roughly 90% of the adolescent population.
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