Wedding photos: Tips for guests

Churches, gardens, restaurants, stages…a single-day wedding involves a network of vastly different settings, each with its own lighting and shooting conditions, as photographers have to alternate between group photos, portraits, close-ups, etc. Follow these tips to come out on top!

Église, extérieur, restaurant, scène… Un mariage condense en une journée des lieux très différents

What to bring?

You want to be able to move about freely, which limits the number of lenses or cameras you can bring:

  • Wide-angle: more details and possibilities when indoors, such as in a church, or for group photos
  • Panoramic: excellent for capturing details, such as the ring exchange, without having to elbow your way through the crowd.

Plan ahead!

How do professional photographers pull off such beautiful wedding photos? They plan ahead, which allows them to be in the right place at the right time and capture that emotional moment perfectly. If you are daydreaming during the event, there is very little chance that you will be ready to snap the newlyweds as they exit the church. With a little pre-nuptial strategizing, you can choose your ideal position and make your final adjustments without having to elbow your way through the crowd. Unlike your lawfully wedded couple, you are still allowed to cheat: Determine with the bride the direction in which she’ll be tossing the bouquet; that way, you will know exactly where to place yourself for that perfect picture.

Before the wedding, make a list of golden moments to capture. Select a few of them and add some shooting ideas to the list. Feel free to take risks and improvise! Here is our list:

  • The bridal preparation, especially hair and make-up. These make for emotionally-charged moments.
  • The arrival of the bride at the church, waiting for her groom, the face of the bride’s father, the exchanging of the vows, the placing of the rings, the kiss, the joy.
  • The civil marriage at City Hall, the loved ones, the kiss, the signatures (close-up on the hands).
  • The grand exit, the rice, the motorcade, walking down the steps, the newlyweds surrounded by their loved ones, family photos, etc.
  • The celebration, the banquet, the gifts, the first dance, the speeches, the guests.
  • A private photo shoot with the newlyweds in a pastoral frame, romantic and coiffed poses. Think of bringing some accessories (frames, balloons, slates for writing sweet messages).
  • Children playing and horsing around makes for beautiful photos.

You can then envision a photomontage of the ceremony.

Plan ahead!

Photos that beam like the bride

Between the church and the garden reception, lighting conditions will change completely. Indoor settings are typically brighter. Increase your ISO to avoid dull indoor photos. Approach your subjects and use the flash to avoid getting heavy shadows on the faces. You may also run into trouble restoring the whiteness of the bride’s dress, especially if the groom is wearing a dark suit.

To avoid yellowish tones, underexpose your photo slightly and, if necessary, make some adjustments before running a test. If the dress appears muddy, overexpose! Lastly, after night falls and the lighting dims, consider increasing your ISO for the cutting of the cake or the first dance. If the result is still dark, use a small diffuser (for example, a large sheet of white paper), with one of the spotlights in the room.

Photos that beam like the bride

Between the church and the garden reception, lighting conditions will change completely. Indoor settings are typically brighter. Increase your ISO to avoid dull indoor photos. Approach your subjects and use the flash to avoid getting heavy shadows on the faces. You may also run into trouble restoring the whiteness of the bride’s dress, especially if the groom is wearing a dark suit.

To avoid yellowish tones, underexpose your photo slightly and, if necessary, make some adjustments before running a test. If the dress appears muddy, overexpose! Lastly, after night falls and the lighting dims, consider increasing your ISO for the cutting of the cake or the first dance. If the result is still dark, use a small diffuser (for example, a large sheet of white paper), with one of the spotlights in the room.

Photos that beam like the bride

The kiss!

A few rules for capturing that most precious kiss:

  • Release before the lips touch
  • Approach the subjects
  • Set your camera to aperture priority mode and adjust the depth of field (aperture priority, low f) to blur the background.
The kiss!
×

Send to a friend

Wedding photos: Tips for guests

Churches, gardens, restaurants, stages…a single-day wedding involves a network of vastly different settings, each with its own lighting and shooting conditions, as photographers have to alternate between group photos, portraits, close-ups, etc. Follow these tips to come out on top!
From:
To:

Loading...